Summer Reading Page

  

Clue Books, One School
Promoting Community and Family Literacy


This is required reading. The books were chosen with reading pleasure and wide-ranging discussion possibilities in mind. Remember to read the book for your grade level before the start of school.

 

Required Books

         or    
Going into Grades 1-3 Going into Grades 4-8

Max B. Kid Spy  by Mac Barnett- One day, Mac (smartest boy in his class in a small town in California) receives a telephone call from the Queen of England, recruiting him to find the crown jewels (well, actually just the Coronation Spoon) and so Mac embarks on his first adventure as a secret agent--with the assurance that the Queen will give him a note excusing him from school.

City Spies by James Ponti - Sara Martinez is facing years in the juvenile detention system for hacking into the foster care computer system to prove that her foster parents are crooks. But then she gets a second chance when a mysterious man offers her a chance to join a group of MI6 affiliated spies.  

Or, Framed by James Ponti - In Washington, D.C., twelve-year-old Florian Bates, a consulting detective for the FBI, and his best friend Margaret help thwart the biggest art heist in United States history.

Why Summer Reading  Is Important

Reading is the most important skill there is. Research shows that reading is crucial to a child’s brain development and intellectual stimulation. And that’s just the beginning:

 

Reading is a gateway skill. It opens the door to all other learning.

Reading is the processing of information. It requires the student to develop a capacity for conceptual thinking — an ability to think about the nature and significance of things.

Reading builds language skills. By becoming more familiar with language through reading, students build a rich vocabulary and an ability to express themselves clearly and creatively.

Reading builds better thinking strategies. Analyzing words, sentences, themes and meaning; concentrating, conceptualizing and visualizing — all these elements of reading are strategies to expand a student’s ability to think.

Reading is active and disciplined. Students learn to choose what they read and when they read, and they learn to discipline themselves to concentrate on the written word.

The best thing you can do is to read for 20 minutes each day!


Enjoy a good book!